If physical illnesses were treated like mental illnesses.

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11 thoughts on “If physical illnesses were treated like mental illnesses.

  1. I found this from Rob’s reblog. The cartoon really shows just how ridiculous and stupid these responses are. Even the biggest blockheads know not to say “have you ever tried not having the flu?” to a flu patient (though they may still say it, depending on how drunk they are!), but perfectly intelligent people might say that about depression (or any mental illness) to a mentally ill person.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I usually get the typical response of . “You’re just lazy and need to get a job”. I’m 25 , worked since I was 16 . Studied and worked from 18 – 22 . I was in a full time job when I collapsed because of a panic attack and the Dr signed me off sick .
      I have heard all of the ridiculous comments “It’s all in your head” “It’s mind over matter” . Granted it’s a mental illness , so yes it is in my head but if it were that simple , can’t they see that mental illness wouldn’t be an issue ? Lol

      There’s not enough info out there to help people understand . So they then become arrogant to it and think that they’re better and know better . Quite sad really :/

      Liked by 2 people

      • Where I live, the demographic tends to be wealthy and well-educated. These are folks who know how to research illnesses, and have the resources available to help them understand. (Good libraries with many resources on the subject, internet availability, local mental illness awareness groups, the mental ability to sift between the junk info and good quality information that is backed up by scientific research: we have ALL of this.) But certain people just choose not to research and understand.

        For some, it may be a lack of time. But for others . . . well, I fail to understand how someone with a doctorate in a scientific field/an advanced degree in a technical field/a vested interest in the subject. wouldn’t take the time to research a loved one’s illness, and would actively prefer ignorance in that one area of their life.

        Thank God, my family has never been like that. When I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, my mom read EVERYTHING she could find on the illness; she did the same when I was bulimic and anorexic. Undoubtedly she inundated my father with all her findings. My husband did research. His family, with all the medical people in it, already knew some of the information.

        Liked by 2 people

      • That is brilliant ! I wish we had that around my area. Sadly we don’t.
        I’ve suffered my whole life , it started in school when I was bullied from age 6 . Then I lost my Grandmother at age 9 amd it just went down hill from there. I thought after school , that life would pick up but the world can be cruel when people don’t want to understand .
        It took my patrents years of research to understand what I’m going through but they ended up finding help online . From America , as in the UK / Wales, we don’t have much help .
        Only now they are bringing CBT classes over here and they are free on the NHS . I was lucky to be offered it . It did help for the 8 weeks of classes but now it’s become tough again .
        There aren’t any support groups local to me . Although I am hoping to start one 🙂 I am researching in to it first though and hoping in the new year , to put it all together .

        I have been asking Doctors for help for years but unless I want to travel 80+ miles every week , there is nothing !

        We do have stress classes but that again only helps a part of it , it doesn’t help those with other aspects of the illness .

        I have always said , if I come into money , I will put it all into helping people with mental health .
        You’d think , by now , this help would be there for all , but it’s not .

        I’m sure one day we will get there though 🙂 If everyone bands together and supports one another then change will happen . It’s just the small steps to get there can become big hurdles for some 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’m sorry that you’ve gone through all this! I’ve been extremely fortunate in my mental illness experience (if “fortunate” is the right word) because of the resources available to me. Having a certain amount of financial power–the money to pay for meds, etc.–and good health insurance is rare and valuable. It’s a privilege.

        So, from your perspective, what can someone like me do to help others in a less fortunate situation? What would be most helpful to you? What can I urge others in my situation to do/understand/consider?

        Liked by 2 people

      • Well the NHS pays for all meds and most health care . But where I’m from we need support groups more than anything !
        I live in a small town , Kidwelly , in Wales. The only support I have are friends and family . Which is great ! But they never fully understand .
        We don’t have anyone to turn to proffessionally. The Doctors don’t understand and just want you on meds. But they made me so ill and one made me suicidal,I had to pull myself off them. The Doctors failed to tell me the side effects of coming off the meds and for two months I was back and forth A&E with non stop pains. I was convinced something was wrong but they found nothing and said it couldnt be the withdrawal …. But I’m now convinced that it was .
        We just need more support put in place . Someone to turn to for help .
        CBT is only for 8 weeks , 50 mins one day a week and yes it helps but afterwards we have no one to turn to .
        I really think , if the support was put in place , then more people would come forward and get help . Suffering in silence is the worst and since blogging I have heard from so many people that they just feel alone and like the Doctors fob them off with meds and are told to just get on with it . Which , I’m sure you know , isn’t a good way to deal with mental health . We are basically left to rot in our own illness .

        Having a support group for people to go to , to open up , to see they arent alone and to have a health proffessional there giving advice would be a great first step for sufferers and for their families ! Helping people understand the illness and urging them to support others and not to brush them off when they are having a bad day 🙂

        Reaching out for me has been the biggest help . Talking halves the problem .
        I am shocked by how many are effected by mental health , I honestly didn’t know . And I feel if others could see this too , then they will step up and reach out .

        It’s just trying to find a mental health nurse who is willing to come to the support group and help :/

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Reblogged this on Laura Droege's blog and commented:
    Unfortunately, the responses in this cartoon are all ones that I and others have had from uninformed people about our mental illnesses. These responses are as unhelpful for the mentally ill person to hear as they are to those with physical illnesses. A better response? “Is there anything I can do to help you right now?” Listen to the response, and do what you reasonably can.

    Liked by 1 person

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